Monthly Archives: August 2016

Create - Style

Back to School Flair Modern Iron On Patches

August 22, 2016

Back to School Flair Modern Iron On Patches

color club | in dog we trust | mercat sushi | too cool | cold pizza club | out to live

Guys, my obsession with patches has reached a new high (or low depending how you look at it). What started as a little obsession for cute, tiny flair pieces for the Back to School post has turned into a desperate need to literally freeze my money in ice blocks to keep me from these gems. So in true blogger fashion, I’m sharing my favorite pieces here instead ;).

Of course a lot of these are from Etsy, but Amazon has a surprising number of good ones as well! Pro Tip: Stalk your favorite artists’ shops! Patches & pins are low cost pieces to make so a lot of artists have started offering unique flair. #makersmovement

Which ones will you be sporting?

 

Create - Style

Back to School Patches 3 Ways

August 18, 2016

back to school patches

Week 2 for Back to School diy posts! This one is so easy though it hardly qualifies. Take a patch, pick a place, iron it on. Bam. We’re done here.

back to school patches

Psych. What kind of diy-er would I be without sharing links & tips? I’ve been loving the embroidery trend this summer and a lot of artists have started stocking pins & patches to hop on the trend. Patches are the greatest way to add flair (anyone remember when Facebook flair was a thing?) to update any piece. Much cleaner and less time consuming than paint or hand sewing. This triple threat diy is cheap, easy, & nets professional results. I can’t stop gushing over these patches guys!

back to school patches

For starters, these patches are ridiculously high quality. International shipping was well worth it for BelsArt (she threw in stickers too!) Just following the included instructions secured the patches on like they were stitched. I can’t stop taking close up shots of the patches because I was so amazed!

Supplies
patches (crocodile, ice cream, good kids)
iron
clean scrap fabric
piece to update

I highly suggest pinning your patch where you want before ironing. They can shift and fingers near a hot iron is not a fun afternoon. Use a scrap piece of thin fabric to cover the patch & working piece to protect from accidental singeing or marks from a dirty iron.

If you have a wonky shaped piece (à la baseball cap) wad some fabric behind to give the ironing some resistance. Other than that, follow the directions that come with each piece as they will vary slightly by maker.

back to school patches

If you’re not ready to commit to a permanent piece, glue interfacing (if your patch is on the thin, flexible side) and a pin back to the backside of your patch. I actually used this method for the ice cream cone patch because I equally love the pocket treat on my shirt & shorts.

P.S. the text on this patch GLOWS IN THE DARK!

back to school patches

Check back for this week’s Sunday Spot to see a few of my favorite patches. If you start looking, pay attention to the edge seams for a quick quality check. Bare spots indicate low thread count which could mean a lesser quality patch. Alo most patches are iron on now, but double check that they aren’t ‘stitching required’.

back to school patches

Find any you want to share? Tag #BacktoSchoolCurated for a chance to be included in the roundup!

Create

Back to School DIY Painted Cord Organizer

August 11, 2016

cord organizer

Can you guys believe summer is almost over? There’s Christmas ornaments on sale already! I had so many plans of ice cream recipes & water games for ctrl +curate that will have to wait. In the meantime, the next big event for some of you is back to school. We’re shifting gears from plant posts and taking a Back to School detour. Let’s kick it off and get started on the organizational right foot with these ridiculously easy & adorable cord organizers.

cord organizer

I love diy’s like this because they’re infinitely customizable. Switch up the elastic color, bead type, length, and these can work as curtain tie backs, electric cord organizers, or pencil round-uppers.

Supplies
paint to decorate
wood beads (I used 10mm)
elastic cord
hot glue

Paint your beads beforehand. I didn’t seal mine because the wood just soaked up the acrylic, but if you’re planning on using them in a more abrasive setting, I recommend sealing beforehand.

cord organizer

Measure out twice the length of the desired finished cord and add an extra inch.

cord organizer

Loop the bead onto the cord. I found it easiest to push the folded end through instead of the two loose ends.

cord organizer

Tie ends off in a simple knot, making sure to leave the extra inch out.

cord organizer
cord organizer
cord organizer
To clean up the end & secure the organizer, draw back one of the ‘bunny ears’ back through the wood bead. Apply glue directly to the knot while letting some of the glue go back into the bead. Trim the threaded bunny ear and loose end once the glue is completely dry.

And what kind of glue should you use? Anything that has ever messed up your clothing. I know from many years of diy-ing that once hot glue hits fabric, it’s never budging. So I went with that. Turning mishaps into learning moments over here.

cord organizer
cord organizer
cord organizer

And here’s an off the cuff pic of how I actually use these guys around the house. They keep my lighting cords nice and off the ground when I’m too lazy to pack away the studio set-up 😉

New Back to School posts will be posted once a week for the next month and topped off with a dorm room tour courtesy of my sister, so keep an eye out!

Grow

The Dirt On: Planting Herbs Indoors

August 3, 2016

planting indoors

Hi everyone! This week, The Dirt continues right along with best practice tips & tricks for potting herbs indoors. Planting season is already winding down, meaning there’s only a few more weeks to get healthy herbs nicely established. The great part about indoor gardens though is the year long growth. So no more procrastinating! Lay down your cardboard, grab your basic tools (If you’re new to the series, check out the ‘Essential Tools for Beginners‘ post), and let’s get dirty 😉

planting indoors
Transplanting Steps & Giving Them the Good Stuff
At the risk of speaking ad nauseam about the importance of using good potting soil & pots with drainage, do it. Because potted herbs are confined to one space, they’re growing environments need a bit more attention. Each plant has its own light, soil, water, fertilizer, and even air flow requirements. For beginners, I highly suggest starting with 1-2 herbs, really learning their needs, and then growing your plant family.

planting indoors Tiny House Hunters
1| Give them the home they’ve always wanted. Researching rooting requirements for each herb beforehand will help you choose the best pot style and keep your babies happy & healthy. Some have deep root systems (like thyme) while others like confined root balls (like lavender) so their potting needs will vary. Line the bottom of the selected pot with gravel or stones for extra drainage. Layer with enough soil over the gravel so when placed on top, the base of your herb lines up with the lip of the pot.

I’ve found that giving the herbs a light watering before repotting helps get them out of the plastic pots and decreases transplant shock. After watering, slowly upturn the carrier pot while grabbing the stem at the base. Gently shake & pull.
planting indoors
Loosen Up
2| Loosen up the root mass to promote root growth in the new pot by massaging your fingers up through the bass. If you discover unhealthy roots, you can trim them with clean shears. Herbs are pretty resilient as long as the main roots & leaves are intact.

planting indoors
Tuck Them In
3| Just like you padded the space underneath the herb with dirt in step 1, you’ll need to surround the herb on all sides with more soil. Kinda like a dirt blanket. Don’t worry about packing it in tightly. If there is enough dirt to support the herb while watering, you’re in the sweet spot.

Planting Herbs Indoors
Potmates & Maintenance Overview
4| If you’re planting indoors, you might also be dealing with a small space. You can cut down on the number of pots you need by co-planting. Basically, this means you can group plants together with similar soil, light, & watering requirements.

If I scared you about over/underwatering, a good rule of thumb is to water once the top inch of soil is dried out until you develop your own schedule. On especially hot weeks, a daily misting can help tide herbs over until the next good soak.

Besides water, potted herbs don’t have a way of finding their own nutrients. Fertilize with a quarter strength liquid fertilizer every other week (unless it is a flowering herb, like lavender).

With the fertilizer your herbs will grow rapidly. They’ll need consistent pruning to be kept bushy. To harvest most herbs, pinch off leave in pairs directly at the stem making sure to always leave new nodes. Go for the big leaves first. They use up more of the plant’s energy that will keep it from growing more leaves.

That does it for this week! The Dirt will be temporarily on hold as ctrl + curate gears up for ‘Back to School’ posts. Let me know if you have any questions, and tag your  plant pics with #plantscurated so I can see!